Category Archives: Cloud

Wearables & IBM MobileFirst – Video & Sample Code

Last week I attended IBM Insight in Las Vegas. It was a great event, with tons of great information for attendees. I had a few sessions on mobile applications. In particular, my dev@Insight session on Wearables powered by IBM MobileFirst was recorded. You can check it out here:

https://youtu.be/d4AEwCOmvug

https://youtu.be/d4AEwCOmvug

Sorry it’s not in HD, but the content is still great! (Yes, I am biased.)

In this session I showed how you can power wearable apps, specifically those on smart watch devices, using either the MobileFirst Platform Foundation Server, or the MobileFirst offerings on IBM Bluemix (cloud).

Key takeaways from the session:

  1. Wearables are the most personal computing devices ever. Your users can use them to be notified of information, search/consume data, or even collect environmental data for reporting or actionable analysis.
  2. Regardless of whether developing for a peripheral device like the Apple Watch or Microsoft Band, or a standalone device like Android Wear, you are developing an app that runs in an environment that mirrors that of a a native app. So, the fundamental development principles are exactly the same. You write native code, that uses standard protocols and common conventions to interact with the back-end.
  3. Caveat to #1: You user interface is much smaller. You should design the user interface and services to acomodate for the reduced amount of information that can be displayed.
  4. You can share code across both the phone/tablet and watch/wearable experience (depending on the target device).
  5. Using IBM MobileFirst you can easily expose data, add authentication, and capture analytics for both the mobile and wearable solutions.

Demos/Code Samples:

In the session I showed 3 sample wearable apps.  Full source code and setup instructions for each app is available at: https://github.com/triceam/MobileFirst-Wearables/

Stocks

A sample WatchKit (Apple Watch) app powered by IBM MobileFirst Platform Foundation Server.

applewatch-stocks

Contacts

A sample WatchKit (Apple Watch) app powered by IBM MobileFirst on Bluemix.

contacts-watch

Heartrate

A simple heart rate monitor using the Microsoft Band, powered by MobileFirst on Bluemix and IBM Cloudant.

heartrate

 

JavaScript All The Things – Or – Why You Should Pay Attention To JavaScript

This post is inspired by all the comments I’ve seen this week about JS in the enterprise. I would have never imagined this 10 years ago, but JavaScript is now pretty much ubiquitous. Here are a few reasons why you need to paying attention to JavaScript if you aren’t already, and why you should definitely not write it off.

First, I think one of the major reasons for JavaScript’s ubiquity is that JavaScript is approachable. It is relatively easy for beginners to learn JavaScript, and powerful enough for advanced users to build complex and reliable systems.

Second, why you need to pay attention, JavaScript is everywhere.

jsatt

You can now use JavaScript to develop on virtually any platform: client side applications, server side logic, embedded chips/IoT devices, manage build scripts and dependencies, and more.

This doesn’t mean you’ll use the exact same code in every case, rather that you can use the same skill set – JavaScript Development – to deliver solutions across multiple paradigms.

The Client Side

JavaScript can be used to power client side apps/user interfaces, and user interactions on numerous platforms and devices.

Web

Of course JavaScript powers the web, this is a given. JavaScript is the primary scripting language for all web browsers. I won’t focus on this much b/c it’s already well known.

Mobile

JavaScript can also be used to power mobile applications that are natively installed on a device.

  1. Apache Cordova/PhoneGap – You can build natively installed apps with web technology using PhoneGap or Cordova. PhoneGap is Adobe’s branded distribution of Cordova, but from the developer’s perspective, they are basically the same thing. Your app runs within a webview on the mobile device, and you build your user interface the same way you you build a dynamic web application. Your user interface is implemented in HTML, styled with CSS, and all interactivity is created with JavaScript.
  2. React Native – JavaScript powered web apps don’t just have to be inside of a a web view. The React Native framework gives developers the ability to write their application using JavaScript and declarative UI elements, and results in a native application running on the mobile device. The logic is interpreted JavaScript at runtime, but everything that the user interacts with (all UI elements) is 100% native, providing a very high quality user experience, and it is now available for both iOS and Android applications.
  3. Unity 3D – You can even develop rich & immersive mobile 3D simulation or gaming experience, entirely powered by JavaScript using the Unity 3D engine. **These can be web, desktop, or mobile, but is often used in mobile gaming.
  4. NativeScript – Framework for building cross-platform native iOS, Android and Windows mobile apps using JavaScript.
Desktop

Yup, desktop apps are not left out of the mix. Most desktop solutions fall into a category similar to Apache Cordova, where the end results is a web view that has access to lower level APIs, whose content is developed with web based technology.

  1. Electron – Node.js + Chromium desktop app container from GitHub
  2. app.js  – Node + Chromium for a desktop app container
  3. nw.js – Another framework for Node +Chromium for a desktop app container
  4. CEF – The Chromium Embedded Framework – a framework for embedding the guts of the chrome browser inside of a desktop app.

… and more… I know Microsoft has a solution for building Windows apps purely out of HTML/JS, and there are more solutions out there that I am forgetting.

In fact, some of my favorite desktop tools, such as SlackAtom and VS Code are actually based on web technology and implemented in HTML/JS. Heck, even Photoshop can be scripted and extended with the generator extensibility layer or have a customized user interface in HTML/JS with design spaces.

The Server Side

Most obviously Node.js – a JavaScript runtime buit on Chrome’s V8 JavaScript Engine – has made huge inroads into server side development and the enterprise. Node.js, powered by frameworks like express.js or loopback.io makes server side development and complex enterprise apps with JavaScript possible.

IoT

Pretty much everything that doesn’t fall in the categories above falls in here. You can develop headless apps that run on Arduino, Raspberry Pi or other small boards completely using JavaScript, you can manage infrastructure and information flow of IoT sensors using JavaScript, you can write on-chip programs for embedded systems using JavaScript, you can control robots with it, and you can even power media-centric connected TV experiences using JavaScript.

Like I said… It’s everywhere.

Ecosystem

It’s not just about where you can build and run JavaScript for your applications. JavaScript has a massive and thriving developer ecosystem.

JavaScript is the #1 most active language on GitHub in both the total number of active repositories and total number of active pushes/commits.

 

http://githut.info/
statistics visualization from http://githut.info/

Here are some stats that show the magnitude of growth and adoption for Node.js/npm.js alone. NPM stats currently shows a total of 186,946 packages available for download, 94,978,032 package downloads in the last day, and 2,451,734,737 package downloads in the last month.

npm
NPM Statistics

 

Node.js adoption is massive, and is still growing.

This doesn’t mean that JavaScript is the best language at everything. It also doesn’t meant that you can take a single piece of source code and run it in every device/context imaginable.

It means that you can use your skills in JavaScript to develop for just about any kind of device/context out there. It’s not going to be write once, run everywhere, rather in the words of the React.js team: learn once, write everywhere.

Video – Smarter Apps with Cognitive Computing

UPDATE 12/22/15:  IBM Recently released a new iOS SDK for Watson that makes integration with Watson services even easier. You can read more about it here.


Last week I had the opportunity to present to a great audience at the MoDev DC meetup group on “Smarter Apps with Cognitive Computing”.   In this session I focused on how you can create a voice-driven experience in your mobile apps. I gave an introduction to IBM Bluemix and IBM Watson services (particularly the Watson language services), and demonstrated how you can integrate them into your native iOS apps. I also covered IBM MobileFirst for operational analytics and remote logging to provide insight into your app’s performance once it goes live.  Check out a recording of the complete presentation in the video below:

https://youtu.be/TGRMmf8e-6s

You can read more detail about how this example works and access source code for the sample application in the links below:

Just create an account on IBM Bluemix and you can get started for free!

This app uses three services available through IBM Bluemix, all of which are available for you to try out:

App Architecture
App Architecture

Feel free to poke around the code to learn more!

Say What? Live video chat between iOS & WebRTC with Twilio & IBM Watson Cognitive Computing in Real Time

What I’m about to show you might seem like science fiction from the future, but I can assure you it is not. Actually, every piece of this is available for you to use as a service.  Today.

Yesterday Twilio, an IBM partner whose services are available via IBM Bluemix, announced several new SDKs, including live video chat as a service.  This makes live video very easy to integrate into your native mobile or web based applications, and gives you the power to do some very cool things. For example, what if you could add video chat capabilities between your mobile and web clients? Now, what if you could take things a step further, and add IBM Watson cognitive computing capabilities to add real-time transcription and analysis?

Check out this video from yesterday’s Twilio Signal conference keynote, where fellow IBM’ers Damion Heredia and Jeff Sloyer demonstrate exactly this scenario; the integration of the new Twilio video SDK between iOS native and WebRTC client with IBM Watson cognitive computing services providing realtime transcription and sentiment analysis.

If it doesn’t automatically jump to the IBM Bluemix Demo, skip ahead to 2 hours, 15 min, and 20 seconds.

Jeff and Damion did an awesome job showing of both the new video service and the power of IBM Watson. I can also say first-hand that the new Twilio video services are pretty easy to integrate into your own projects (I helped them integrate these services into the native iOS client (physician’s app) shown in the demo)!  You just pull in the SDK, add your app tokens, and instantiate a video chat.   Jeff is pulling the audio stream from the WebRTC client and pushing it up to Watson in real time for the transcription and sentiment analysis services.

Complete Walkthrough and Source Code for “Building Offline Apps”

I recently put together some content on building “Apps that Work as Well Offline as they do Online” using IBM MobileFirst and Bluemix (cloud services).  There was the original blog post, I used the content in a presentation at ApacheCon, and now I’ve opened everything up for anyone use or learn from.

The content now lives on the IBM Bluemix github account, and includes code for the native iOS app, code for the web (Node.js) endpoint, a comprehensive script that walks through every step of of the process configuring the application, and also a video walkthrough of the entire process from backend creation to a complete solution.

Key concepts demonstrated in these materials:

  • User authentication using the Bluemix Advanced Mobile Access service
  • Remote app logging and instrumentation using the Bluemix Advanced Mobile Access service
  • Using a local data store for offline data access
  • Data replication (synchronization) to a remote data store
  • Building a web based endpoint on the Node.js infrastructure

You can download or fork any of the code at:

The repo contains:

  • Complete step-by-step instructions to guide through the entire app configuration and deployment process
  • Client-side Objective-C code (you can do this in either hybrid or other native platforms too, but I just wrote it for iOS).  The “iOS-native” folder contains the source code for a complete sample application leveraging this workflow. The “GeoPix-complete” folder contains a completed project (still needs you to walk through backend configuration). The “GeoPix-starter” folder contains a starter application, with all MobileFirst/Bluemix code commented out. You can follow the steps inside of the “Step By Step Instructions.pdf” file to setup the backend infrastructure on Bluemix, and setup all code within the “GeoPix-starter” project.
  • Backend Node.js app for serving up the web experience.