Tag Archives: drones

Is that me on the company home page?

It’s not every day that you get the opportunity to have your work showcased front and center on the main landing page for one of the largest companies in the world. Well, today is definitely my lucky day. I was interviewed last month about a drone-related project that I’ve been working on that focuses on insurance use cases and safety/productivity improvement by using cognitive/artifical intelligence via IBM Watson. I knew it was going to be used for some marketing materials, but the last thing that I expected was to have my image right there on ibm.com. I see this as a tremendous honor, and am humbled by the opportunity and exposure.

ibm.com.screenshot

You can check out the complete article/interview at: https://www.ibm.com/thought-leadership/passion-projects/smart-drone/

Interview: Gathering & analyzing data with drones & IBM Bluemix

Here’s an interview that I recently did with IBM DeveloperWorks TV at the recent World of Watson conference. In it I discuss a project I’ve been working on that analyzes drone imagery to perform automatic damage detection using the Watson Visual Recognition, and generates 3D models from the drone images using photogrammetry processes. The best part – the entire thing runs in the cloud on IBM Bluemix.

It leverages the IBM Watson Visual Recognition service with custom classifiers to detect the presence of hail damage on shingled roofs, Cloudant for metadata/record storage, the IBM Cloud Object Storage cross-region S3 API for massively scalable & distributed image/model/asset storage, and Bare Metal servers for high performance computing.

Bare Metal servers are dedicated machines in the cloud: not shared, and not virtualized. I’ve got mine setup as a linux server with 24 cores (48 threads), 64 Gigs of RAM, a SSD RAID array, multiple GPUs, etc… and it improved my photogrammetry rendering from hours on my laptop down to merely 10 minutes (in my opinion the best part).

I’ve done all of my testing with DJI Phantom and DJI Inspire aircraft, but really, it could work with any images, from any camera that has embedded GPS information.

Check out the video to see it in action.

Significant Advances in the Consumer Drone Market

Lately I’ve been so focused on mobile, apps, development, conferences, and more that I haven’t posted much besides IBM work news and projects.  Well, I’m taking a break for just a moment…

If you’ve followed my blog for a while, then you already know that I’m pretty much obsessed with “drones”.  It is by far the most fun and exciting recreation that I’ve taken up in a very long time. Not only are they fun to fly, but they get you into some amazing views that were previously inacessible, and have applications far beyond just taking pictures.  I’ve written how-tos for aerial photography and videography, taken tons of pictures for fun, and even shot some indoor footage for TV commercials.

I’m always following the news feeds, watching the advances in technology, watching prices drop, and am continually blown away by what the industry is offering.  The last week to ten days have been nothing short of amazing.


First let’s start with the latest from DJI, who announced the Phantom 3 –  a consumer drone with some very impressive specs and performance.

The Phantom 3  is an easy to fly copter that sports a 3-axis gimbal (camera stabilizer), up to 4K video footage, an integrated rectilinear (flat) lens camera, live HD first-person view, integrated iOS and Android apps, a vision positioning system (for stabilized indoor flights) and up to a 1.2 mile flight range.  All for a cost of under $1300 USD.  That’s one heck of a package, and officially makes my old Phantom look like a dinosaur.


3 Days later, 3D Robotics announced the Solo, a direct competitor to the Phantom. The Solo is also very impressive, and has already won an award for Best Drone at NAB in Las Vegas.

The Solo also has a 3-axis gimbal for stabilized footage, and is designed to work with GoPro cameras.  In fact, it is the only copter that integrates with the camera controller and can control the GoPro remotely. The Solo also has dual processors (one in the controller, one in the copter), HD first person view, and has an upgradeable system that can have new camera systems or payloads configured.  It doesn’t have an optical stabilization system built in, but that can be added to the expansion bay.  What really sets the Solo apart is the intelligent auto-pilot sytem that appears to make complex shots very easy. All of this with a price tag starting at $1000 USD.

I currently own DJI products, but this has gotten me seriously considering a purchase.


Both of these are small aircraft targeting consumers, but from the look of it they are definitely capable of high end applications.  Their small size make them extremely portable, and a potential add in many industries and use cases.  Larger copters are always available for larger scale applications.


Let’s not forget drones for the enterprise…  Last week Airware launched their drone operating system.  Business can now license their operating system for commercial applications and data collection.


Meanwhile, people everywhere still freak out over drones as a political debate, ignoring their utility and positive value. The rules for commercial use continue to shake out, but oh man, it’s an exciting time.