Tag Archives: Photography

Salisbury Festival Time-lapse

Every year the town I live in has a weekend-long spring festival. There are rides for the kids, live music, beer, and lots of food. This year I have a great view overlooking the carnival area, so I decided to do a time-lapse video capturing all of the activity. The trucks pulled in before I got to the office on Thursday morning, but I managed to capture most of the set up, all the way until the trucks drove away on Sunday night.

I set up two GoPro cameras. One was a stock GoPro Hero 3+ Black edition capturing 7MP narrow FOV stills every 60 seconds. The other was a GoPro Hero 3 Black with a “flat” lens capturing 5MP stills every 60 seconds. Unfortunately the 3+ stopped recording after about 24 hours – I’m not sure if the camera over heated, had a bug in the firmware (I realized I’m 1 version back from the latest), or if my memory card had a corrupt sector. The image sequence for Thursday is from this camera. The backup camera kept running all 4 days and captured the entire festival.

Assembling this was simple – I imported the images as image sequences in Adobe Premiere, arranged them on the timeline, cut out the night sequences (there was almost no activity during them), added some transitions, titles, and color correction (contrast and saturation), then added some background music.  I added slow zooming and panning to each of the shots to add drama, which helped make things a lot more interesting.

Assembling A Panorama with Adobe Photoshop CC

I just put together a walkthrough of creating an aerial panorama from images captured with a GoPro camera and an RC helicopter over on Behance.  Check it out for full details.

Here’s the final panorama to whet your appetite:

Aerial Panorama

Aerial Panorama

High-res here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/andytrice/13899593912/

Enjoy!

Aerial Photography with a GoPro Camera and Adobe Creative Cloud tools

My second article on aerial imaging with a remote controlled helicopter is now live in the March 2014 issue of Adobe Inspire!  The first article focused on aerial videography and Adobe video tools. This time it’s all about aerial photography with a GoPro camera and DJI Phantom (and how to bring these images to life with Photoshop and Lightroom).

You can read it on the web or download the FREE digital publication version to learn more. I HIGHLY recommend the digital publication version, which was created with Adobe Digital Publishing Suite.

Inspire

Be warned (AGAIN) – flying helicopters with cameras attached is highly addictive. You may easily become obsessed with the endless possibilities.

If you want to learn more, definitely do not miss the Top Gun Flight Training For Hobbyist Photographers workshop at the upcoming Photoshop World conference next month!

Here are just a few panoramic images I’ve captured over the last year with my copter. You can check out even more in my Flickr collection.

San Francisco at Sunrise

Richmond, VA at Sunrise

The Las Vegas Strip

To learn more you can read the full article online or download the FREE digital publication, and don’t forget to become a member of Creative Cloud to take advantage of all the creative tools that Adobe has to offer.

Believable Compositions & Creativity in Adobe Photoshop

What makes a great composition in Photoshop? Well, that all depends on what you’re trying to achieve and personal taste – I won’t even attempt to answer that.

What makes a composition believable? That one is a little bit easier… We’ve all seen bad Photoshop jobs – you know, those where colors are way off, lighting is terrible, or edges are left jagged and pixellated. For the most part, I’d attribute a believable Photoshop composition to having qualities that mimic realism. Consistent use of colors, none of those jagged edges, appropriate use of shadows and lighting, proper perspectives, and most importantly, attention to detail.

Not quite sure what I mean? Check out these examples of some inspiring and impressive Photoshop compositions…

“Drifting Away” by Erik Johansson

“Immortal” by Alex Koshelov

“Kings Landing” via Creative Station

Want more samples and inspiration, just search for Photoshop Speed Art on YouTube, and there is a plethora of content to get your creativity flowing.

Want to create these for yourself?

Just become a member of Adobe Creative Cloud - you’ll have everything you need. Then check out the Photoshop learning center to learn how to make the most of the creative tools.

Time-Lapse Photography with Creative Cloud

In addition to my addiction to aerial photography, I’m also fascinated by time-lapse photography. With time lapse photography, you set up your camera to take pictures on an interval. This could be every few seconds, every few minutes, every few hours, or heck, once a day. It’s really up to you how you want to set up your shots and what you want to shoot. In any case, you can end up with a lot images – each by itself could be great, but it only tells a limited story.  However, you can put all those images together in a sequence to create some truly amazing visuals. Subtle motion becomes pronounced, and you can clearly view the passage of time. Often, this ends up with an amazing visual story that would be hard to otherwise capture.

All that you need start diving into time-lapse photography is a camera that is capable of capturing images on an interval – normally there is some kind of time lapse mode that lets you set up your image frequency and duration. Then, once you’ve got your images, you can process them with Creative Cloud tools to bring out their full potential.

Here are two time-lapse sequences I created this week–one a snow storm, one a sunset.

Neither sequence required a lot of specialized or expensive equipment. I used a GoPro Hero 3 Black camera, set it on my window sill, and let it do it’s thing. (I do want to upgrade to better gear, but this still works fantastically, and I love the GoPro.)

GoPro Hero 3 Black Edition

GoPro Hero 3 Black Edition

The sunset was a ten second interval captured over about 2 hours and played back in 30 seconds. The snow storm was a 60 second interval captured over roughly 14 hours, played back in 40 seconds.

So, you’ve captured the images, what next? 

You can check out the video below, or read on for further explanation how I processed and assembled the images into a video sequence, complete with links to Adobe documentation and tutorials.

Before putting everything together as a sequence, I wanted to enhance the photos to bring out as much detail as possible. Here’s where Adobe Lightroom comes into the picture. I used Lightroom to import all of my photos, add them to a collection, and then perform bulk/batch processing to enhance all of the images.

Editing Photos with Lightroom

Editing Photos with Lightroom

First, select an image to use as your baseline for adjustments. I wouldn’t start with your darkest image, and I wouldn’t start with your lightest either. I normally start somewhere in the middle. Select the image, and then switch over to the “Develop” module. I use the basic panel to make adjustments to this image. For the GoPro, I like to bring up the shadows and bring down the highlights to pull out details out. If I’m shooting a landscape, I also like to bring up the clarity and maybe even the vibrance and saturation – just don’t over do it. You could also use one of Lightroom’s presets if you want; it’s really up to you. Just be extra careful that it is not too dark or too light b/c we’re going to apply these settings to all images in the sequence.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom - Basic Panel

Lightroom – Basic Panel

If you want to adjust hue, saturation or luminance of specific colors, you can do that within the HSL/Color/B&W panel. Using this you can make specific colors more or less intense.  I normally try to tone down the yellows in my GoPro images after I’ve increased overall saturation.

Since I used the GoPro, there is a lot of fisheye distortion from the lens – the GoPro has a 2.77mm lens whichgives an ultra-wide 170 degree field of view. This makes for some awesome wide angle shots, but sometimes you don’t want that extreme distortion. This is where lens correction gets really handy. Next, I opened up the Lens Correction panel. As soon as you check the “Enable Profile Corrections” checkbox, Lightroom should automatically select the GoPro Hero 3 Black Edition lens profile based upon metadata within the image. I didn’t want to fully flaten the image, just reduce the wide angle, so I turned down the distortion correction using the “Distortion” slider.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom - Lens Correction

Lightroom – Lens Correction

Once you have your baseline image the way you want it, you need to apply these settings to all of your images in the sequence. Just select them all, and then either click on the “Sync…” button in the bottom right of the Develop module, or use the Settings -> Synch Settings menu. This will apply you changes on this image to all of the images that were selected. This will happen automatically if you are using auto-sync. You can learn more about synchronizing metadata between photos in the Lightroom documentation.

Next, be sure to view several images in your collection, the lightest to the darkest, and make sure they all look decent. If you need to make any changes because they are too light, or too dark, or don’t have the right contrast, then now is your time to fix it. Once you’re happy with the images in your collection you next need to export them. I exported as JPG with 100% quality at full resolution with sequential names.

Now we’ve got a lot of processed images. What’s next? We need to make a video!

At this point, I switch over to Adobe Premiere. Premiere is an incredible tool for producing videos. It makes the process of arranging video compositions very easy. It’s easy enough for a beginner to use, yet powerful enough to create high-dollar Hollywood productions. If you haven’t used Premiere before, definitely check out my Crash Course in Premiere, check out Video Editing for Non-Video Professionals, and don’t miss the Adobe Premiere channel on Adobe TV.

The first thing to do is create a new video project, then create a new sequence. If you want full HD, you’ll want to select an one of the 1080p presets (or create a custom sequence). Once you have your sequence created, you need to import your images for editing.

To import your images, select the File -> Import menu, select the first image in your sequence, and select the “Image Sequence” checkbox. (DO NOT MISS THIS STEP!)

Premiere - Import Image Sequence

Premiere – Import Image Sequence

Once imported, the image sequence will be treated like a video clip within Premiere. Drag it onto your sequence timeline, then start editing. You can speed up or slow down playback with time remapping, apply color correction, add transitions, or more.  Then add a title, add some music, and export it.

Editing within Adobe Premiere

Editing within Adobe Premiere

If you’re wondering how I got the motion in the time lapse sequence, no I didn’t have the camera moving. There are devices which make this possible, but I just used a video editing trick. The images are 12 MP, or 4000 by 3000 pixels. A “standard” HD video sequence is 1920 by 1080 pixels. The image below reflects this scale – the red area represents the 4000 by 3000 still image, and the yellow represents the 1920 by 1080 video.

Video & Image Size Comparison

Video & Image Size Comparison

You’ll notice that leaves us with a lot of room to zoom and pan around the image. I zoom into the image so that it fills the entire horizontal space within the video sequence – you can zoom in more if you want. This leaves a fair amount of vertical content outside the clipping rectangle of the video. You can use this to your advantage by panning vertically within this area.  I just made the pan very slow and deliberate so it appears that there is constant motion of the camera throughout the entire video.

The final result is that the content in the video (yellow area) appears to move because the actual image sequence is moving relative to the video viewport.