Tag Archives: pltaform

Preview: New HTML5/PhoneGap Project

Here’s a quick preview of my new HTML5/PhoneGap data vizualization app. Once released, this will be available on multiple platforms, in multiple app stores, AND it will be completely open source.  Just waiting on app store approvals…

You can expect a full writeup on how this was built after it is released.

Enjoy!


UPDATE:

This application is now available in iOS and Android markets, and full source code is available. See details at http://www.tricedesigns.com/2011/12/05/introducing-the-us-census-browser-application/

Adobe Flex & AIR: One Developer Platform, Many Devices

In this series, I’d like to highlight Adobe’s mobile offerings, and the variety of platforms that can be supported from a single codebase.     I wrote a simple URL Monitoring utility application that will check the status of various HTTP endpoints using the AIR URLMonitor class.   I now have that application running on 3 OS platforms, in 4 ecosystems (5th coming soon), supporting phone and tablet interfaces, and all with a single codebase

Many Apps, One Platform

Here’s the official app description that I’ve been using:

URL Monitor is a simple diagnostic application that will allow you to quickly and easily monitor the status of various URL endpoints. Simply enter a URL into the text box and add it to the list. A polling HTTP request will be made every 10 seconds to determine the availability of a given endpoint. HTTP codes 200, 202, 204, 205 and 206 will be identified as a success with a green check. All other HTTP codes will indicate a problem as a red ‘X’. To remove a listing, simply perform a horizontal swipe on a given row to reveal a delete button. All monitoring is paused when the application is in the background.

This application is currently available in the following ecosystems:

  1. Apple’s App Store
  2. Google Android Market
  3. Amazon Appstore
  4. Barnes & Noble Nook Store
  5. BlackBerry App World (coming soon)

You may be wondering, “How did you get a single codebase into so many markets?”… Well, you’re in luck.  Here’s detailed instructions how to get from Flash Builder into each Ecosystem:

  1. Flex/AIR on Devices: From Flash Builder to iOS
  2. Flex/AIR on Devices: From Flash Builder to Android Ecosystems
    1. Google Android Market
    2. Amazon App Store
    3. Barnes & Noble Nook App Store
  3. Flex/AIR on Devices: From Flash Builder to BlackBerry App World (coming soon)

What’s really interesting about this is the activity that I have seen on each market.  The application is free on each market, and became available over the last few weeks.   I have done absolutely no promotion of it… This is the first announcement that I have made.

As of 9/15/2011, the application has been live in Apple’s store for 3 weeks, and has had 554 downloads; it has been live in the Google Android Market for 3 weeks, and has had 20 installes (only 11 active); it has been in the Amazon market for 2 weeks, with 0 installs (yes, that is a zero); and surprisingly, it has been on the Nook store since Sept 1, and has had 816 downloads!   Now, that was unexpected.

Flex/AIR on Devices: From Flash Builder to the Nook Store

This post is a part of my series “One Developer Platform, Many Devices“.

In this post, we will focus on the workflow of getting your APK from Flash Builder into the Barnes & Noble Nook Store.    First, review the process for building an Android APK file within Flash Builder. However, there are a few additional steps to test your application on a nook device.

With the default settings, the Flash Builder (and the Android SDK) will not be able to detect you nook device as an Android tablet.   In order to be able to deploy via USB, you must first register as a nook developer at https://nookdeveloper.barnesandnoble.com/, and also be sure to download the Android SDK from http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html.

Once you are a registered developer, you will have access to tools that enable you to put your apps onto a nook device.  First, you must download and install the Nook SDK add-on to the Android SDK.

Nook SDK Setup

This will download and install the Nook SDK.   Once installed, the installation process will need to restart ADB.   Click “YES” and allow it to proceed through the restart process.

Nook SDK Setup - Complete

Once you are a registered developer, you will have tools accessible to enable “Developer Mode” on your device, which allows you to provision the device for development.   Go to the “Developer Mode” section of the nook developer portal and enter the device names and serial numbers for your dev devices.   From here you will be able to download a provisioning file.

Nook Developer Provisioning

The provisioning file will allow you to deploy applications directly to the nook via USB.    Attach the Nook Color device to your computer via a USB connection.   The Nook Color device will show up as a device in Finder.   Copy the provision.cmd file that you downloaded from the “Developer Mode” provisioning portal directly into the root of the Nook Color device.

Nook Provisioning File

Next, eject/unmount the Nook Color device.    Now, use the tools within the Android SDK to restart ADB (Android Debug Bridge):

./adb kill-server
./adb start-server 

Once ADB has restarted, use the “adb devices” command to list all connected Android devices (The Nook Color device must still be connect via USB, even though it has been unmounted).

./adb devices 

You should see your device listed in the output:

ADB - View Device

Now that you are able to view your Nook Color device using ADB, Flash Builder will also be able to deploy to it.   You will be able to Run/Debug directly from Flash Builder and launch applications on the Nook Color device.    This follows the normal Flash Builder debug process.

However, there is one trick… you may notice that if you go to the “apps” menu on the Nook color, you won’t see any of your applications deployed via USB.   Don’t fret… they actually are on your device.  There is just a trick to view them.   From the “apps” menu, click on the “archived” button.  A popup will be displayed here.  Now, press and hold the “volume up” button.  When the speaker appears on the screen (continue holding the volume button), tap on the speaker.   When you tap on the speaker, the “extras” screen is displayed.  (You can release the volume button now.)  The “extras” screen will list all of your manually installed applications, and you will be able to re-launch your installed apps.

From here, you can generate your release-build APK as you normally would from Flash Builder. Once you have your APK generated and tested, you’re ready to prepare it for the Nook Store.  Sign into the Nook Developer Portal, and go to the “Applications” section.   Click on the “Add New Application” button.

First, you will need to enter the primary metadata for the application (name, type, price, version, etc…).

Nook Portal - New Application

Once you have completed the basic information, click on “Save and Continue”, and you will be redirected to the “Description & EULA” tab.   Enter an application description and an optional license agreement (I left this blank b/c I do not have any special terms for my app).

Nook Portal - App Description

When ready, click “Save and Continue” to enter the “Keywords and Category” tab.   On this screen, enter descriptive keywords and categories to help categorize your application within the Nook store.

Nook Portal - Keywords & Category

When you have your categorical information all set, click “Save and Continue” to proceed to the “Icons & Screenshots” screen.   Here you will need to set the application icon and add application screenshots.

Nook Portal - Media & Images

Now this is where the application approval process is a little different from other app stores.   You need to click “Send for Application Approval”, and the application metadata must be approved before you can upload a binary APK file.

Once the application metadata is approved (this took about a week for my app), you will be able to upload the APK binary.

Nook Portal - Upload Binary

After you have uploaded and submitted the binary APK file, the binary file will need to be approved before it is actually available within the Nook store.   The binary approval took another week+, so the overall approval process took over 2 weeks.   Once approved, your application will appear in the nook store, and will be ready for public consumption!

You can check it out live in the Nook Store at:

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/url-monitor-andrew-trice/1105281055

Live in Nook Store

Flex/AIR on Devices: From Flash Builder to the Amazon App Store

This post is a part of my series “One Developer Platform, Many Devices“.

In this post, we will focus on the workflow of getting your APK from Flash Builder into the Amazon Appstore.    First, review the process for building an Android APK file within Flash Builder.  Once you have your APK generated, you’re ready to prepare it for the Amazon Appstore.

First, navigate to https://developer.amazon.com/ and click on the “Amazon Appstore for Android” link. Once there, you will need to walk through the full registration process to create your account.

Amazon Appstore Landing Page

Once you click on the “Get Started” button, you will be guided through the Appstore registration process. Once that is complete, you will be directed to the Appstore developer portal home page.   From here, just click on “Add a New App”.

Amazon Appstore Home

Next, you will being the App upload wizard.   First, you will need to enter primary metadata for the application, including a title, form factor, supported languages, and contact information.  Once you have entered this information, click on the “Save” button.

Amazon Appstore App Metadata

Next, you need to enter merchandising information.   This includes the app category, keywords, a description, price, and release/availability dates.   Once you have completed all of your merchandising information, click on the “Save” button to proceed.

Amazon Appstore App Merchandising Info

Next, you will have to specify content rating information.   Just fill out the information about your content, and click on the “Save” button to proceed.  I didn’t run into any content rating issues in the Amazon Appstore, like I did with the iOS App Store.

Amazon Appstore App Content Ratings

Next, upload multimedia that will be associated with the application.  This includes application icons (note: they must match, event though this screenshot doesn’t show it – I was rejected b/c of this), and actual screenshots of the application.

Amazon Appstore App Multimedia

Scroll down to see more of the “Multimedia Content” form.  You will also be able to enter promotional images and promotional video assets for your application.  Once you have uploaded all necessary multimedia, click the “Done” button.

Amazon Appstore App Promotional Media

Now you are ready to upload your APK Binary.  Follow the instructions for uploading an APK file.  Once it is uploaded you will see information about the file that was uploaded.

Amazon Appstore App Binary

Finally, click on the “Submit App” button to submit your application for approval.  There is an approval process for the Amazon Appstore similar to Apple’s, and my application was live in less than a week from submission.

You can check it out live in the Amazon Store at:

http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Trice-Mobile-URL-Monitor/dp/B005HRSHAQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=mobile-apps&qid=1316095776&sr=1-1

Live in the Amazon Appstore

Flex/AIR on Devices: From Flash Builder to the Google Android Market

This post is a part of my series “One Developer Platform, Many Devices“.

In this post, we will focus on the workflow of getting your APK from Flash Builder into the Google Android Market.    First, review the process for building an Android APK file within Flash Builder.  Once you have your APK generated, you’re ready to prepare it for the Android Market.

First, navigate to market.android.com/publish/signup to register for an Android Market account.   Once there, you will need to walk through the full registration process to create your account.

Android Market Registration

Once you are fully registered, you will be directed to the Android Market publishing home page/dashboard.   From here, just click on “Upload Application” to start the process of uploading your application’s APK binary file.

Android Market Dashboard

Once you have successfully uploaded the application APK, you will be prompted with the details about your application.  Click “Save” to being entering application metadata information.

Android Market APK Uploaded

You will need to upload at least 2 screenshots of your application, as well as an application icon for use within the Android Market.

Android Market APK Metadata

Next, scroll down to the “Listing Details” area and begin entering metadata for your application.  This includes an application title and description, as well as release notes, classifications, and promotional text.

Android Market APK Metadata - Description

Next, scroll down to the “Publishing Options” screen, where you can configure copy protection settings, content ratings, pricing, and available markets.

Android Market APK Metadata - Pricing and Markets

Finally, enter your support/contact information and check the consent checkboxes.

Android Market APK Metadata - Contact and Consent

Once you have completed the form in its entirety, scroll back up to the top of the page and click on the “Save” button to save content, or “Publish” to save and publish the application to the Android Market.  Once you have successfully published it, your application will show up in your home dashboard, as shown below.

Android Market APK App Ready

Thats it!  The Android Market makes it extremely easy to publish your application.   My application started showing up in the market after about 30 minutes from pressing the “Submit” button.

You can check it out live in the Google Android Market at:

https://market.android.com/details?id=air.com.tricedesigns.URLMonitor

Live in Android Market

Or, just snap a photo of this to download to you android device immediately…