Tag Archives: video

Say What? Live video chat between iOS & WebRTC with Twilio & IBM Watson Cognitive Computing in Real Time

What I’m about to show you might seem like science fiction from the future, but I can assure you it is not. Actually, every piece of this is available for you to use as a service.  Today.

Yesterday Twilio, an IBM partner whose services are available via IBM Bluemix, announced several new SDKs, including live video chat as a service.  This makes live video very easy to integrate into your native mobile or web based applications, and gives you the power to do some very cool things. For example, what if you could add video chat capabilities between your mobile and web clients? Now, what if you could take things a step further, and add IBM Watson cognitive computing capabilities to add real-time transcription and analysis?

Check out this video from yesterday’s Twilio Signal conference keynote, where fellow IBM’ers Damion Heredia and Jeff Sloyer demonstrate exactly this scenario; the integration of the new Twilio video SDK between iOS native and WebRTC client with IBM Watson cognitive computing services providing realtime transcription and sentiment analysis.

If it doesn’t automatically jump to the IBM Bluemix Demo, skip ahead to 2 hours, 15 min, and 20 seconds.

Jeff and Damion did an awesome job showing of both the new video service and the power of IBM Watson. I can also say first-hand that the new Twilio video services are pretty easy to integrate into your own projects (I helped them integrate these services into the native iOS client (physician’s app) shown in the demo)!  You just pull in the SDK, add your app tokens, and instantiate a video chat.   Jeff is pulling the audio stream from the WebRTC client and pushing it up to Watson in real time for the transcription and sentiment analysis services.

Why Your Enterprise Needs To Be Ready For Mobile

I recently attended the IBM InterConnect conference, and it was great to be there presenting IBM MobileFirst and engaging with our clients and partners.  While there, I also took part in the “Ignite” presentation series. If you aren’t familar with Ignite, each presenter has 20 slides, with the slides auto-advancing every 15 seconds. That gives you 5 minutes to make your point, and in the session you get to see 5 or 6 presentations on different topics within an hour.  I really liked this format, so I re-recorded it to share here…

Here are all my sources for the charts/data.  I chose to use publicly accessible data for everything.  If you haven’t been paying attention to mobile usage numbers and adoption, its quite staggering, and definitely worth paying attention to.

And if you need to get your enterprise on mobile, you should look at IBM MobileFirst.


IBM Worklight Powered Native Objective-C iOS Apps

IBM MobileFirst Foundation (also known as IBM Worklight) is a middleware solution for developing mobile applications. Out of the box, Worklight enables security and authentication, device management, encrypted storage, operational analytics, simple cross platform push notifications, remote logging, data access, and more…

Historically, most people think that Worklight is just for creating hybrid mobile (HTML-powered) applications. While this is one of the powerful workflows that Worklight enables, it’s also the proverbial “tip of the iceberg”. Worklight does a lot more than just provide the foundation for secure hybrid applications. Worklight also provides a secure foundation for native applications, and can be easily incorporated to any existing (or new) native app.

In this post, I’ve put together a video series to take a look at just how easy it is to setup Worklight in an existing iOS native application to provide remote log collection, application management, and more. Read on for complete detail, or check out the complete multi-video playlist here.

The existing app that I’ll be integrating is based on an open source Hacker News client, which I downloaded from GitHub. Check out the video below for a quick introduction to what we’ll be building.

If you want, you can leverage the Worklight IDE – a set of developer tools built on top of the Eclipse development environment. If you don’t want to use Eclipse, that’s OK too – Worklight can be installed and configured using the Worklight command line interface (CLI) and you can leverage any developer tools that you’d like to build your applications. Want to tie into Xcode ? No problem. I’ll be using the Worklight CLI to setup the development environment in this series.

Setting up the Worklight Server

The Worklight server is the backbone for providing Worklight features. App managment, remote logging, operational & network analtics, and all of the Worklight features require the server, so the first thing that you need to do is setup the server for our environment. Check out the next video, which will guide you through setting up a Worklight server/project using the CLI.

First things first, you have to start the Worklight server. If you haven’t already configured a Worklight server, run the create-server command to perform the initial setup – this only has to be run once ever.

wl create-server

Now that the server is setup, we need to create a Worklight project. For this walkthrough, I’ll just call it “MyWorklightServer”:

wl create MyWorklightServer

Next, go into the newly created project directory and go ahead and start it.

cd MyWorklightServer
wl start

Once the server is started, add the iOS platform:

wl add api

You will be prompted for an API name. This can be anything, but you should probably give it a meaningful name that identifies what the API will be used for. In this walkthrough I specify the name “MyiOSNativeAPI”.


Next you will be prompted to select a platform, select “iOS”
Next, build the project, and then deploy it to the server:

wl build
wl deploy

Next, launch the Worklight console to view that the project has been deployed and the native API has been created. The console will launch in the system web browser.

wl console
Worklight Console


Be sure to check out the Worklight CLI documentation for complete detail on the CLI commands.

Xcode Integration

Next we need to setup the Xcode project to connect to the newly created Worklight server. If you’re adding Worklight to a new Xcode project, or an existing Xcode project, the preparation steps are the same:

  1. Add Worklight files to your Xcode project
  2. Add framework dependencies
  3. Add the -ObjC linker flag

This next video walks through configuration of your Xcode project and connecting to the Worklight server (which we will cover next):

In the Xcode project navigator, create a folder/group for the Worklight files, then right click or CTRL-click and select “Add Files to {your project}”…


Next, navigate to the newly created MyiOSNativeAPI folder and select the worklight.plist file and WorklightAPI folder, and click the “Add” button.


Once we’ve added the files to our Xcode project, we need to link the required framework/library dependencies:

  • CoreData.framework
  • CoreLocation.framework
  • MobileCoreServices.framework
  • Security.framework
  • SystemConfiguration.framework
  • libstdc++.6.dylib
  • libz.dylib

Next, In the Xcode project’s Build Settings search for “Other Linker Flags” and add the following linker flag: “-ObjC”.


If you’d like additional detail, don’t miss this tutorial/starter app by Carlos Santanahttps://github.com/csantanapr/wl-starter-ios-app

 Connecting to the Worklight server

Connecting to the Worklight server is just a few simple lines of code. You only have to implement the WLDelegate protocol, and call wlConnectWithDelegate, and the Worklight API handles the rest of the connection process. Check out the video below to walk through this process:

Implement the WLDelegate protocol:

//in the header implement the WLDelegate protocol
@interface MAMAppDelegate : UIResponder <UIApplicationDelegate,
   WLDelegate> {

//in the implementation, add the protocol methods
-(void)onSuccess:(WLResponse *)response {
-(void)onFailure:(WLFailResponse *)response {

Connect to the Worklight Server:

[[WLClient sharedInstance] wlConnectWithDelegate: self];

Next, go ahead and launch the app in the iOS Simulator.

You’re now connected to the Worklight server! At this point, you could leverage app management and analytics through the Worklight Console, or start introducing the OCLogger class to capture client side logging on the server.

App Administration via Worklight Console
App Administration via Worklight Console


Worklight Analytics Dashboard
Worklight Analytics Dashboard


Remote Collection of Client Logs

Once you’re connected to Worklight, you can start taking advantage of any features of the client or server side APIs. In this next video, we’ll walk through the process of adding remote collection of client app logs, which could be used for app instrumentation, or for debugging issues on remote devices.

On the server, you’ll need to add log profiles to enable the capture of information from the client machines.

Adding Log Profiles
Adding Log Profiles

On the client-side, we just need to use the OCLogger class to make logging statements. These statements will be output in the Xcode console for local debugging purposes. If a log profile has been configured on the server, these statements will also be sent to the Worklight server.

OCLogger *logger = [OCLogger getInstanceWithPackage:@"MyAppPackageName"];
[OCLogger setCapture:YES];
[OCLogger setAutoSendLogs:YES];

//now log something
[logger log:@"worklight connection success"];
[logger error:@"worklight connection failed %@", response.description];

For complete reference on client side logging, be sure to review the Client-side log capture API documentation.

App Management & Administration

Out of the box, Worklight also provides for hassle-free (and code-free) app management. This enables you to set notifications for Worklight client apps and disable apps (cutting off access to services and providing update URLs, etc..). This next video walks you through the basics of app management.

Be sure to check out the complete documentation for app management for complete details.

All done, right?

At this point, we’ve now successfully implemented Worklight server integration into a native iOS app. We have remote collection of client-side logs, we can leverage app management, and we can collect operational analytics (including platforms, active devices, and much more).

If you don’t want to leverage any more Worklight features, then by all means, ship it! However, Worklight still has a LOT more to offer.

Exposing Data Through Adapters

Worklight also has the ability to create adapters to expose your data to mobile clients. Adapters are written in JavaScript and run on the server. They help you speed up development, enhance security, transform data serialization formats, and more.

In the next two videos we will walk through the process of collecting information inside the native iOS application and pushing that into a Cloudant NoSQL data base (host via IBM Bluemix services).

Cloudant databases have a REST API of their own, so why use a Worklight Adapter? For starters, Worklight becomes your mobile gateway.  By funneling requests through Worklight, you are able to capture analytic data for every server invocation, and Worklight gives us the ability to control access to the enterprise.  Worklight gives you the capability to cut off mobile access to the backend at any time, just by changing the API status.

Now let’s take a look at the process for exposing the Cloudant database through a Worklight Adapter:

Once the data adapter has been configured, it is simple to invoke the adapter procedures to get data into or out of the your applications.

This next video covers the process of pushing data into the Cloudant database adapter from the native mobile client application:

Once again, you will have to implement the WLDelegate protocol to handle success/error conditions, and the procedure invocation is implemented using the WLClient invokeProcedure method:

NSMutableDictionary *userProfile = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
[userProfile setValue:self.email.text forKey:@"email"];
[userProfile setValue:self.firstName.text forKey:@"firstName"];
[userProfile setValue:self.lastName.text forKey:@"lastName"];    

WLProcedureInvocationData * invocationData = [[WLProcedureInvocationData alloc] initWithAdapterName:@"CloudantAdapter" procedureName:@"putData"];
invocationData.parameters = @[userProfile];

[[OCLogger getInstanceWithPackage:@"UserProfile"] log:@"sending data to server"];
[[WLClient sharedInstance] invokeProcedure:invocationData withDelegate:self];

It is as simple as that.

IBM MobileFirst Foundation (aka Worklight) is for more than just hybrid app development. It is a secure platform to streamline your enterprise application development processes, including everything from encryption, security and authentication, to operational analytics and logging, to push notifications, and much more, regardless of whether you’re targeting hybrid app development paradigms, or native iOS, native Android, or native Windows Phone projects.

Lens Correction For GoPro Video Footage Has Never Been Easier!

I love my GoPro camera.  It takes amazing pictures and captures incredible videos, and can get into some extreme situations that other cameras probably would not survive – no wonder it is one of the best selling cameras in the world.  I also love the fisheye lens, but there are times when the fisheye effect is too much. We’ve had lens correction in Photoshop and Lightroom for a while, optics compensation in After Effects, but now it is easier than ever to non-destructively remove the fisheye effect from GoPro video footage directly inside of Adobe Premiere Pro.  Check out the video below to see it in action.

Applying lens correction (or lens distortion removal) is incredibly easy.  There are new effects presets in the effects panel that enable video editors to simply drag an effect onto their clip to have the lens correction applied.  Just select the preset for the resolution and field of view (FOV) that match what you used to capture your footage, and drag it right onto your clip.  They under Presets -> Lens Distortion Removal -> GoPro. For those fellow quadcopter enthusiasts, you may also notice some presets for the DJI Vision cameras!

GoPro Lens Distortion Presets

Once you’ve applied the preset to your footage, you can tweak it as you like to customize the amount of correction.  You can under-correct, over-correct, or change the center/focal point of the correction.  I normally tend to leave it with the default settings…

GoPro Lens Distortion Effect Controls

Once you’ve applied the correct preset for your footage, you’ll be able to see that the lens distortion has been removed.  The straight lines will now appear straight, and everything will line up to scale.

Lens Distortion Removal in Action

Now get out there and go capture some amazing footage of your own!

Salisbury Festival Time-lapse

Every year the town I live in has a weekend-long spring festival. There are rides for the kids, live music, beer, and lots of food. This year I have a great view overlooking the carnival area, so I decided to do a time-lapse video capturing all of the activity. The trucks pulled in before I got to the office on Thursday morning, but I managed to capture most of the set up, all the way until the trucks drove away on Sunday night.

I set up two GoPro cameras. One was a stock GoPro Hero 3+ Black edition capturing 7MP narrow FOV stills every 60 seconds. The other was a GoPro Hero 3 Black with a “flat” lens capturing 5MP stills every 60 seconds. Unfortunately the 3+ stopped recording after about 24 hours – I’m not sure if the camera over heated, had a bug in the firmware (I realized I’m 1 version back from the latest), or if my memory card had a corrupt sector. The image sequence for Thursday is from this camera. The backup camera kept running all 4 days and captured the entire festival.

Assembling this was simple – I imported the images as image sequences in Adobe Premiere, arranged them on the timeline, cut out the night sequences (there was almost no activity during them), added some transitions, titles, and color correction (contrast and saturation), then added some background music.  I added slow zooming and panning to each of the shots to add drama, which helped make things a lot more interesting.