Tag Archives: video

Lens Correction For GoPro Video Footage Has Never Been Easier!

I love my GoPro camera.  It takes amazing pictures and captures incredible videos, and can get into some extreme situations that other cameras probably would not survive – no wonder it is one of the best selling cameras in the world.  I also love the fisheye lens, but there are times when the fisheye effect is too much. We’ve had lens correction in Photoshop and Lightroom for a while, optics compensation in After Effects, but now it is easier than ever to non-destructively remove the fisheye effect from GoPro video footage directly inside of Adobe Premiere Pro.  Check out the video below to see it in action.

Applying lens correction (or lens distortion removal) is incredibly easy.  There are new effects presets in the effects panel that enable video editors to simply drag an effect onto their clip to have the lens correction applied.  Just select the preset for the resolution and field of view (FOV) that match what you used to capture your footage, and drag it right onto your clip.  They under Presets -> Lens Distortion Removal -> GoPro. For those fellow quadcopter enthusiasts, you may also notice some presets for the DJI Vision cameras!

gopro-lens-effect-preset

GoPro Lens Distortion Presets

Once you’ve applied the preset to your footage, you can tweak it as you like to customize the amount of correction.  You can under-correct, over-correct, or change the center/focal point of the correction.  I normally tend to leave it with the default settings…

gopro-lens-effects

GoPro Lens Distortion Effect Controls

Once you’ve applied the correct preset for your footage, you’ll be able to see that the lens distortion has been removed.  The straight lines will now appear straight, and everything will line up to scale.

lens-correction-in-Premiere

Lens Distortion Removal in Action

Now get out there and go capture some amazing footage of your own!

Salisbury Festival Time-lapse

Every year the town I live in has a weekend-long spring festival. There are rides for the kids, live music, beer, and lots of food. This year I have a great view overlooking the carnival area, so I decided to do a time-lapse video capturing all of the activity. The trucks pulled in before I got to the office on Thursday morning, but I managed to capture most of the set up, all the way until the trucks drove away on Sunday night.

I set up two GoPro cameras. One was a stock GoPro Hero 3+ Black edition capturing 7MP narrow FOV stills every 60 seconds. The other was a GoPro Hero 3 Black with a “flat” lens capturing 5MP stills every 60 seconds. Unfortunately the 3+ stopped recording after about 24 hours – I’m not sure if the camera over heated, had a bug in the firmware (I realized I’m 1 version back from the latest), or if my memory card had a corrupt sector. The image sequence for Thursday is from this camera. The backup camera kept running all 4 days and captured the entire festival.

Assembling this was simple – I imported the images as image sequences in Adobe Premiere, arranged them on the timeline, cut out the night sequences (there was almost no activity during them), added some transitions, titles, and color correction (contrast and saturation), then added some background music.  I added slow zooming and panning to each of the shots to add drama, which helped make things a lot more interesting.

Improving The Quality Of Your Video Compositions With Creative Cloud

I’ve been spending a lot of time with Adobe video tools lately… everything from videos for the blog, to promotional videos, to help/technical videos.  Here are a few topics that beginners in video production need to think about… audio processing and color correction.

First, you can make so-so video look great with a few simple color correction techniques. Second, a video is only as good as its audio, so you need solid audio to keep viewers engaged.  Hopefully this post helps you improve your videos with simple steps on both of these topics.

To give you an idea what I’m talking about, check out this before and after video. It’s the exact same clip played twice.  The first run through is just the raw video straight from the camera and mic.  Colors don’t “pop”, it’s a little grainy, and the audio is very quiet.  The second run through has color correction applied to enhance the visuals, and also has processed audio to enhance tone, increase volume, and clean up artifacts.

Let’s first look at color correction.  Below you can see a “before” and “after” still showing the effects of color correction.  The background is darker and has less grain, there is more contrast, and the colors are warmer.

Before and After - Color Correction

Before and After – Color Correction

The visual treatment was achieved using two simple effects in Adobe Premiere Pro.  First I used the Fast Color Corrector to adjust the input levels.  By bringing up the black and gray input levels, the background became darker, and it reduced grain in the darker areas.  Then, I applied the “Warm Overall” Lumetri effect to make the video feel warmer – this enhances the reds to add warmth to the image.

Color Correction Effects in Adobe Premiere

Color Correction Effects in Adobe Premiere

You can enhance colors even further using color correction tools inside of Premiere Pro, or open the Premiere Pro project directly within SpeedGrade for fine tuning.

Next, let’s focus on audio…

You can get by with a mediocre video with good audio, but nobody wants to sit through a nice looking video with terrible audio. Here are three simple tips for Adobe Audition to help improve your audio, and hopefully keep viewers engaged.

In this case, I thought the audio was too quiet and could be difficult to understand.  My goal was to enhance audio volume and dynamics to make this easier to hear.

I first used Dynamics Processing to create a noise gate. This process removes quiet sounds from the audio, leaving us with the louder sounds, and generally cleaner audio.  You could also use Noise Reduction or the Sound Remover effects… the effect that works best will depend on your audio source.

Dynamics Processing (Noise Gate) in Adobe Audition

Dynamics Processing (Noise Gate) in Adobe Audition

Next I used the 10-band graphic equalizer to enhance sounds in specific frequency ranges.  I brought up mid-range sounds to give more depth to the audio track.

10 Band EQ in Adobe Audition

10 Band EQ in Adobe Audition

Finally, I used the Multiband Compressor to enhance the dynamic range of the audio.  Quieter sounds were brought up and louder sounds were brought down to create more level audio that is easier to hear and understand.  However, be careful not to make your audio too loud when using the compressor!  If you’ve ever been watching TV and the advertisements practically blow out your eardrums, this is because of overly compressed audio.

Multi-band Compressor in Adobe Audition

Multi-band Compressor in Adobe Audition

Want to learn more?  Don’t miss the Creative Cloud Learn resources to learn more about all of the Creative Cloud tools – the learning resources are free for everyone! If you aren’t already a member, join Creative Cloud today to access all Adobe media production tools.

Aerial Videography with the GoPro Camera and Adobe Creative Cloud Tools

Interested in aerial videography with remote control helicopters? Well, you’re in luck! This month’s issue of Adobe Inspire magazine features my article which introduces aerial videography with a DJI Phantom multirotor helicopter and a GoPro camera!

You can read it on the web or download the FREE digital publication version to learn more. I recommend the digital publication version, which was created with Adobe Digital Publishing Suite.

Interested in focusing on aerial photography instead of videography? Stay tuned for the March Adobe Inspire issue next month, which will feature a complimentary article focusing on still images captured with the same helicopter configuration. Subscribe today to be notified automatically when the new version is available.

Adobe Inspire-1

Be warned – flying helicopters with cameras attached is highly addictive. You may easily become obsessed with the endless possibilities, as I have.

Here are a few videos I’ve captured with this setup, and processed with Creative Cloud.

Some scenic shots in and around San Francisco…

A digital short where I was playing around with After Effects…

The sky really is the limit!

OK, do I have your attention yet? To learn more you can read the full article online or download the FREE digital publication, and don’t forget to become a member of Creative Cloud to take advantage of all the creative tools that Adobe has to offer.

Heard of the Creative Cloud Packager?

The Creative Cloud Packager is a tool for CC Enterprise and CC Team customers that enables them to easily package Creative Cloud products and updates for deployment within their organizations.  It lets you select specific Creative Cloud products and/or updates and package them into .pkg or .msi installers (optionally with a serial number for Enterprise customers).  These packages can then be deployed on their own or integrated with third-party deployment tools like JAMF Casper or Microsoft SCCM.  The Creative Cloud Packager even lets you control Creative Cloud update behaviors and more.

With the recent releases of Creative Cloud Packager, you can now edit existing deployment packages, create deployment packages from local media (DVDs), and even create deployment packages for older (CS6) creative applications, if you have the proper license.

Want to learn more about the Creative Cloud Packager or get specific information on deployment package details? Do not miss the Creative Cloud Packager help documentation.

If you’re looking for an overview, don’t miss these videos covering the Creative Cloud Packager for both Enterprise and Team customers.

Deploying Creative Cloud for teams with Creative Cloud Packager

Deploying Creative Cloud for enterprise with Creative Cloud Packager